Kepler

Kepler

3 Workshops over 3 terms
Instructors; Joseph Crane and Enid Newberg

Each individual 5-week workshop is $195, $530 if you take all three (students signing up for all three courses get $50 off the price of taking the courses individually). All three workshops are required to be counted as a diploma elective or for the Multi-Cultural Traditions Certificate.

The cultivation of soul is the key to human flourishing and happiness, in this life and in future lifetimes. This is a basic truth held by wisdom traditions of all kinds – Eastern and Western, ancient and contemporary – yet this means different things in different traditions.

Most of us have also experienced a “soul crisis” or “dark nights of the soul” in which we feel our very existence is called into question and when we find our way back – we sense we have changed in a fundamental way.

The soul’s crises and cultivations are one of the reasons we work with astrology. And this concern for the soul has been part of astrology throughout its history. This program is the most comprehensive treatment of soul and astrology offered anywhere. It traces the connections between concepts of soul, from philosophy, religion and astrology, through Western and Eastern history and practice. It will introduce you to a range of perspectives and applications that can aid in living a good life and help sustain the spirit through life's transitions.

All three courses survey the traditions that astrologers inherited and created and apply their ideas to astrological practice.

Instructor: Gary Christen

Symmetrical Astrology in the Modern World -
New Tools for the Ancient Arts

This course will aquaint the participant with the background, materials and methods behind the emerging Symmetrical Astrology. Symmetrical Astrology is a modern framework for astrology comprising the work of Arthur Blackwell, Alfred Witte, Rob Hand and Gary Christen. It affords astrology the possibility of a truely structured form with common rules, observations and methods in keeping with modern times. Please note that this course only references Uranian Astrology and uses the Uranian System as a departure point for the structural integration of future astrological possibilites.

Because students are expected to practice the  techniques each week, there will be a discount for the course and a 1/2 price discount for the software used to work with symmetrical astrology, Nova Chart Wheels.

Recently two new moons were discovered orbiting Pluto.  They were called P4 and P5 (pretty dull). Planetary astronomer Mark Showalter announced a contest on February 13, 2013 where the public was asked to help name the newest discoveries. The named suggested needed to come from Greek mythology.

With the help of Star Trek fans, the most popular name turned out to be Vulcan followed by Cerberus. Vulcan was the Roman god of fire and is a nephew of Pluto. Cerberus was the three-headed hound that guarded the gates to the underworld. Go to http://www.plutorocks.com/to see how the voting came out. For more details about how Vulcan got in the running, click here.

The voting results do not automatically mean that P4 and P5 will end up being called Vulcan and Cerberus. SETI is going to recommend the winning names to the International Astronomical Union — the organization ultimately responsible for naming the moons. While the IAU will take the results into consideration, they have final say over in naming these tiny moons.

Pluto's three bigger moons already had mythological names: Charon, the ferryman of Hades; Nix for the night goddess; and the multi-headed monster Hydra. Charon is almost as large as Pluto, so some astronomers consider them to be a double-planet system. 

 

February 15, 2013 will be a close flyby of an asteroid named 2012 DA14. This is a smaller asteroid (although its impact would be quite large if it hit the earth), about 50 meters in size--to small to see without a telescope. There is an interesting video that shows its near-earth pass from the perspective of the asteroid on the website Universe Today.

If you don't have a telescope, you will still be able to see a near-earth visitor when comet PANSTARRS gets closer in March. For those of you in the Southern Hemisphere, you should have the best views from now to the end of February. The Southern Hemisphere is also where the comet Lemmon can barely be seen as a greenish glow right now.

Comet ISON will become visible as early as October, could be as bright as the full moon. NASA has caught it's first pictures at 493 million miles away. Read More