FAQ General Information

In general, personal charts are not used in the live portion of the class. However, you as a student may be asked to interpret your own chart as part of a written assignment and receive an evaluation or comments from your instructor.

The reasons personal charts are not often used or interpreted during the live session are:

Privacy – Natal charts and the work done in interpreting charts expose a great deal of private information. The live chats are recorded and all students in the class have access to it. Neither Kepler nor the student has any control over how that recording may be used outside of the classroom.

Ethical – Related to the privacy issues above, there are ethical issues inherent in reading a student’s chart in class. And, ethically, a faculty member should never do a consultation for a student's chart while that student is enrolled.

Pedagogical – When using an individual student’s chart for discussions or class exercises, it is inevitable that students focus more on the processes of their own chart than on what is happening in the class as a whole. In addition, it is far too easy to forget that the specific focus of the exercise is to maintain a critical eye toward the questions raised by any techniques being studied.

Students will certainly use multiple astrological charts in the classroom to examine and explain how charts have been used and interpreted historically through to the present, and the sociological and cultural issues involved. They will also explore how charts have been cast and interpreted by different astrological traditions.

Of course students can still ask questions in class related to their own charts. And, of course, students are welcome to share their charts with their fellow students and friends if they wish to at any time outside the classroom.

Not by federally recognized accrediting agencies. Kepler College was authorized by the Higher Education Coordinating Board of Washington to grant AA, BA and MA degrees from March 9, 2000 through March 9, 2010, with an extension through to March 9, 2012 to complete a teach-out of current students. Although this type of authorization is called "accreditation" in some States (for example, Connecticut), this is not the same as national or regional accreditation recognized by the Federal government.

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