Joseph Crane

Joseph Crane

Over the past few decades, “chaos theory” and “complexity theory” have emerged as new scientific models for understanding chaotic and/or complex systems. Chaos theory has grown out of physics and mathematics. Complexity theory has developed mainly from studying biological and human systems. These theories share a natural alignment with the spirit and practice of astrology, more so than other attempts to use astrology with the concepts of modern science. The current configuration of Uranus and Pluto makes this an auspicious time to discuss chaos and complexity theory with astrologers.

Earlier this summer Nelson Mandela was hospitalized, was repeatedly placed in critical condition, and released from his hospital to go home. No news for month. Then, as the world found out quickly, on Thursday December 5 he finally departed from this life.

International media was well prepared for his death, and the press coverage has had carpet bombing dimensions. Saying goodbye to Mandela has become a major international event and most national leaders will be on hand for his memorial service this week. Now is the perfect time to look at his life and his astrology. First a little biographical background is helpful.

-- by Joseph Crane.

An examination of the astrology of this Presidential campaign, using many difficult predictive techniques, is a complicated enterprise.  Here are some of the things I have surmised from my investigation.

Obama and Romney do not like each other or even respect each other; in fact they drive each other a bit crazy.  There’s also sufficient Mars intruding on the first debate that it may be a rhetorical Armageddon.  Expect an October surprise of some kind, one that will make Obama look bad, although his campaign will probably survive intact.  Romney may wilt sometime before the end of the campaign, a victim of physical stress or exhaustion.

Charles Dickens, great novelist of the 19th century, has his “bicentennial” this month that is being celebrated across the world with parties, parades, readings; recently there have been many featured books and articles and blogs about this great literary man.  He is known for many full-length novels such as Great Expectations, Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, and Tale of Two Cities, but is particularly known for having written and published the shorter A Christmas Carol that helped to revive the once-fading holiday and give it a secular tone.  Many of his works, especially A Christmas Carol, have been adapted to stage screen, and television. Dickens’ works were successful in their own time and made him a celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Below we will look at his chart using both modern and classical techniques.

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